It Makes Sense…

Dr. Steven Ayre, MD

I have managed to get into the Doctor’s Manual, and I find the whole concept to be really a wonderful piece of work. It has actually served to clarify some of the deep mystery and dissatisfaction I have always felt about the thyroid system. Dr. Wilson’s discovery of this syndrome will answer a lot of questions for a lot of physicians, I am sure.

I have a reputation for being open-minded. A patient looking for help was referred to me by someone who knew of me. She came in and gave me the Doctor’s Manual. I looked it over and it made sense to me because I always knew there was a missing piece to thyroid understanding. She actually knew more about it than me because she had read it chapter and verse but I supervised her and we learned together. She did fine, went on her merry way, and keeps sending people. In this particular area (usable understanding of the thyroid system) of the medical literature, there is nothing. Understanding of Wilson’s Temperature Syndrome has filled a big void in my clinical experience.

Dr. Steven Ayre, MD
Clinical Assistant Professor, Chicago Medical School
Burr Ridge, IL

Dr. Charles Resseger, DO

I have found that there are patients with Wilson’s Temperature Syndrome everywhere. I have found them in my own family practice that I was not previously aware of. I have known for many years that there was a patient with all the symptoms of hypothyroidism with normal lab tests. I could never explain it until Dr. Wilson’s wonderful discovery. It now makes so much sense to me.

Dr. Charles Resseger, DO
Norwalk, OH
President-elect, American Academy of Environmental Medicine

Dr. Stephen L. Leighton, MD

The fact that T3 therapy has such a huge impact on the lives of some of my patients, has a big impact on me, so I keep treating it. Initially, I thought it was rather strange also, until I saw the changes that were taking place. Then, investigating the logic behind the treatment, a logic based on biochemistry and physiology, I found it made sense . . . AND worked!

“I would think that doctors would be a lot more interested in learning about T3 therapy for Wilson’s Syndrome especially when some of their patients who have been suffering for years recover quickly with the treatment under the care of another physician. I find it quite surprising when they don’t seem to be. Even though the literature shows that the traditional measures of thyroid function are clinically based, meaning that our “normal values” are based on the clinical picture. Most physicians seem to rely upon the numbers even when the patient in front of them is stating unambiguously that the symptoms have not cleared up. It is not as though this is a “secret” therapy. It doesn’t rely on some “secret” formula or bizarre concoction, but is based simply on a solid understanding of basic physiology.”

Dr. Stephen L. Leighton, MD
Winston-Salem, NC

Dr. Timothy J. Smith, MD

It’s only when I read the Doctor’s Manual that I saw that this was real and that there was scientific reasoning behind it and it made sense.

Dr. Timothy J. Smith, MD
Author of Renewal: The Anti-Aging Revolution
Berkeley, CA

Dr. Ron Hunninghake, MD

Even in medical school thyroid was kind of a mystery. The tests were confusing. There was nothing practical, they were over-complicated and hard to get a grasp on. For me, Dr. Wilson’s book was the first book that explained thyroid physiology in a practical and usable way, and in terms patients can also understand. The big thing was T4 to T3 conversion. Your book was the first to explain what was really going on physiologically. It reminds me of the saying I heard from a professor while in medical school. He said that when it comes to lab tests, “Don’t let the tail wag the dog.”

Dr. Ron Hunninghake, MD
Wichita, KS

Endocrinologist

Clearly there are people who benefit emotionally, physically and metabolically from T3 even though it has been shown clearly and unequivocally that they do not have a problem with diminished production of thyroid hormone. For years Gynecologists have treated infertility empirically with T3 when failures occurred. And they often saw good results even though I know very well that those were not hypothyroid people.

Endocrinologist
Los Angeles, CA

Endocrinologist

The alternative medicine community for some time has felt there may be better ways of using thyroid hormone. And not being constrained by double-blind, placebo-controlled, prospective studies they go ahead and help patients using their intuition and common sense. We endocrinologists realize that there may be better ways of using thyroid hormone and we’re still looking for those ways and we’re probably going to find some answers in what you guys have been doing all along.

Some people have symptoms which don’t quite fit into a diagnostic category. When they aren’t getting diagnosed with anything that is helping them when they go to see traditional doctors such as myself; and when an alternative medicine doctor will come in and say, “Well let’s try some thyroid;” and when it’s done skillfully; I think some patients have benefited. I’m a board-certified endocrinologist. I’m a hard science kind of guy. When I run into an alternative medicine doctor using alternative diagnoses and methods, but using them with the appropriate caution and skill then I’m generally happy with their care.

I have patients in common with an alternative medicine doctor in town. The main thing that I’ve seen working with this doctor is the skillful manner in which T3 is used so that the patients do not get hyperthyroid symptoms. When some careless doctors think they can fix the world’s problems of tiredness, sleepiness, depression, achiness and obesity by using T3, they tend to use it carelessly. They end up with patients with insomnia, anxiety, palpitations, and shakiness. Yes, maybe they feel a little less tired but they’re also feeling funny in a different way. They’re getting over-stimulated. The doctor I enjoy working with doesn’t do that. Even though this doctor’s way of looking at thyroid is more empiric [based more on experience than studies] than mine, I have always liked working with this doctor because I don’t see sick, thyrotoxic patients coming into my office. And the patients say that they have an improvement in many of the things one would expect to improve with T3.

Endocrinologist
Anchorage, AK

…And It Works…

Dr. Stephen L. Leighton, MD

Over the last 8 years, since the first person came to me asking for assistance in working through this protocol, I have been repeatedly impressed that this therapy worked where multiple other attempts, from anti-depressants to standard thyroid replacement therapy, have not. The strongest rationale for doing this can be found in these points:
1) It is simple. This is not a complex process. It takes a little time to educate the patient in the process of tapering up, identifying the plateau dose, self-monitoring, and then tapering back off. The rest is logical and intuitive.
2) It is safe. We are using a hormone identical to active human T3. The dosages are well within a safe range and can be monitored easily.
3) It is inexpensive. A full course of treatment, a single 6 – 7 week cycle, costs only about $100. This is far below the cost of therapy for most other chronic conditions.
4) If it doesn’t work, little is lost . . . AND, it might reveal the next step to be taken.
I have seen some 500+ patients, all self-referred, for this condition in the last 8 years. The strongest testimony to the efficacy of this treatment is that I have never advertised or promoted this, patients have found their way to my office solely based on the recommendations of others that have been treated successfully. Once the stream of patients began, it has never stopped.

Around 85 to 90% of the patients that I treat for Wilson’s Syndrome respond to the treatment, to some degree. Of those about 50 percent seem to recover fully with only one cycle of T3 therapy and are able to wean off and be done. Of the other 50 percent about half respond temporarily, but the symptoms recur rapidly, apparently because of the continued personal stress or lifestyle instability. For the remainder of those who respond, we find that for some the response is only a partial response and reveals that there is something else involved (ie yeast overgrowth, etc.) for which the Wilson’s Temperature Syndrome is actually an adaptive response. By eliminating the Wilson’s Temperature Syndrome component, the underlying problem is more evident, leading to further investigation.

Dr. Stephen L. Leighton, MD
Winston-Salem, NC

Dr. Charles Resseger, DO

I was first introduced to Wilson’s Temperature Syndrome approximately 7-8 years ago by a patient who had a number of problems and who reads profusely. She piqued my interest and I began researching. I read the Doctor’s Manual and have probably at this point in time, treated well over 500 patients with amazingly good results.

Dr. Charles Resseger, DO
Norwalk, OH

Dr. Sandra Denton, MD

I was attracted to investigate Wilson’s Temperature Syndrome and therapy with time release T3 because of the stories a trusted colleague in Colorado Springs kept telling me. He even suggested it might be beneficial in treating my own Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Because of classic hypothyroid symptoms, I had had numerous thyroid tests performed, all of which had been “normal.” When indeed it was a crucial key in my own recovery, I started using it with my patients. Now 8 1/2 years later it is an integral part of my practice. Patients come to me by word-of-mouth from satisfied patients. After reading the book or logging onto the Wilson’s Temperature Syndrome web site, they are eager to get started on “something that seems to be the first thing that makes sense in a long time.”

I’m often able to discontinue the therapy using the time release form of T3. In my opinion, the major advantage of Wilson’s Temperature Syndrome [over T3/T4 combination therapy] is to ” reset” the system to work on its own instead of taking over the work of the thyroid gland and having to take medication the rest of your life.

Dr. Sandra Denton, MD
Anchorage, AK

Dr. Ian Nesbit, ND

“90 to 100% percent of patients I treat for Wilson’s Syndrome improve. When there aren’t a lot of complicating factors patients are amazed because it’s wonderful. It just explains 17 years of misery.”

Dr. Ian Nesbit, ND
Billings, MT

Dr. Ron Hunninghake, MD

Dr. Wilson’s work is a big part of what I do every day .

Dr. Ron Hunninghake, MD
Wichita, KS

Dr. Steven Ayre, MD

T3 therapy for Wilson’s Syndrome is wonderful. I’m really enjoying it. I can say from my own experience, from just using it, it’s wonderful. It makes you see changes in people’s lives. It’s beautiful.

Dr. Steven Ayre, MD
Burr Ridge, IL

…Best When Done Properly.

Dr. Timothy J. Smith, MD

Doctors and patients shouldn’t even try to do T3 therapy without having first read the Doctor’s Manual.

When patients read the Doctor’s Manual I have very little difficulty with the treatment. I’ve had the most trouble in patients who haven’t taken the time to read it. I insist that every patient read the Doctor’s Manual before I treat them with T3. And for the patients who are on T4 containing medicine, I insist that they read the Doctor’s Manual before they wean off of it. I think it would be impossible for a doctor to implement this treatment very well or easily in his practice without insisting that every patient read the Doctor’s Manual first. It makes it so much easier. I once had a patient tell me, “I think I need a T4 test dose.” He showed me in the Manual what that was, and he was right. One patient told me, “Will you read case study No. 5? I think that’s what’s going on with me.” These pointers from patients can be extremely helpful. They have time to study the Doctor’s Manual carefully and see how it applies to them.

Dr. Timothy J. Smith, MD
Berkeley, CA

Dr. Stephen L. Leighton, MD

I have seen many patients treated by doctors for Wilson’s Temperature Syndrome with poor results. Often, it appears that these patients have been treated with T3 in a way that’s doesn’t seem fully logical. The approach taken doesn’t seem to reflect an understanding of known thyroid physiology and/or the principles outlined in the Doctor’s Manual. In my experience, the results people experience clearly depend on the way the T3 is used.

Dr. Stephen L. Leighton, MD
Winston-Salem, NC

Dr. Charles Resseger, DO

I absolutely do see a strong correlation between how well the patients follow the instructions in therapy and how well they do. I learned a long time ago that you cannot help people who do not want to help themselves. I’m so busy but as long as the patients will follow my instructions I will do everything in my power to get them well.

Dr. Charles Resseger, DO
Norwalk, OH

Dr. Ron Hunninghake, MD

I find it extremely important for the patient to be educated as much as possible and this often increases their motivation to comply with the somewhat complicated instructions.

I have also found some differences between compounding pharmacies and how they prepare the T3. One pharmacist expressed surprise when I explained to him the time release factor was supposed to be for 12 hours. He had been using a different grade of methycellulose and it was only 8 hours. Another pharmacist insisted on putting dye in the T3 and others insist on putting the T3 in color capsules to differentiate doses. This is not good for my allergic patients and may explain why some doctors are not getting the desired results with their patients on Wilson’s Temperature Syndrome treatment.

Dr. Sandra Denton, MD
Anchorage, AK