• If the patient has no symptoms before treatment (just a low temperature).
  • Weigh pro’s and con’s of treatment (see Q2).
  • Some symptoms are more predictably responsive than others.
  • The whole trick is to start with a steady level of T3 and keep it steady (see Q13).
  • Use the percentage index to get a quick start on clinical assessment.
  • Slow compensators tolerate rapid increases better than rapid compensators tolerate slow ones (see Q6, Q7).
  • If the patient’s symptoms resolve completely with a temperature less than 98.6 (which is very seldom the case), it is not necessary to push the temperature higher (see Q14).
  • The word sufficiently pertains to the present cycle, and may or may not also pertain to the treatment in general.
  • The full benefit of a cycle, in terms of resetting the system, is obtained once the temperature has been captured (p75).
  • The closer patients’ temperatures are brought to 98.6, the less medicine they’ll need on subsequent cycles (if such cycles are needed at all) (See Q14).
  • If patient may be hypothyroid (low thyroid gland function), it may be necessary to support the patient with T4 as she is being weaned off a cycle of T3 therapy.
  • When weaning, the goal is to wean slowly enough that the patient’s temperature doesn’t drop.
  • T3 therapy can be used as symptomatic, therapeutic, or prophylactic treatment.
  • The more corrected a patient’s Wilson’s Temperature Syndrome, the less likely it is to relapse.
  • Once people have been successfully treated, and are doing well off treatment, it is usually much easier to correct their symptoms, should they relapse, than it was the first time around.
  • Patients’ symptoms can often improve in stages that stick, just as they often have worsened in stages that have stuck.
  • Subsequent cycles are promising if there is a net clinical improvement from a previous cycle.
  • Periods of great stress and/or stringent dieting are not generally the best times to wean cycles of T3 therapy.
  • Any side effects indicate less than optimal management and should be addressed.
  • It is best to address side effects early so that they can be easily nipped in the bud.
  • Patients should check their pulse rates daily and call if they go above 100 b/m.
  • The best treatment of severe side effects of T3 therapy is prevention, but…
  • T3 levels that are too high, too low, or unsteady can cause side effects.
  • The higher the dose of T3 therapy the harder it is to keep T3 levels steady.
  • Steadiness is everything.
  • Unsteady T3 levels are the most common cause of side effects, and poor clinical results.
  • It is not wise to stop the T3 medicine abruptly.
  • T3 level unsteadiness can result in decreased clinical improvement, before it results in side effects.
  • Side effects from T3 therapy are dependent mainly on how well the molecule is delivered.